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Therapeutic Recipes

Anti-inflammatory Ginger Tea

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Anti-inflammatory Ginger Tea

Ginger, A Powerful Superfood: The Benefits of Ginger Tea Fresh ginger root has many properties that qualify it as a “superfood”. Here are just a few benefits of fresh, raw ginger root:

  • Eases Gastrointestinal Discomfort
  • Anti inflammatory effects on arthritis
  • Induces Ovarian Cancer Cell Death
  • Reduces Pain
  • Aids in Weight Loss
  • Helps Carry Wastes Out of the Body (Detox)
  • Alleviates Morning Sickness and Motion Sickness

Ginger tea has been studied for its healthy benefits on digestion and improving gastrointestinal ailments in a wide number of individuals. It has also been shown to alleviate gas and constipation. Using peppermint tea and ginger root tea together after a meal may help ease digestion, which results in better nutrients being absorbed and utilized. Also, with better digestion comes easy and healthy weight loss. This is one reason why I love adding ginger to my green smoothies.

Ginger tea has shown some promise in aiding apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, resulting in less cancer cells overall. Although not a sole treatment, it has been documented that the cancer cell death is indeed initiated by properties called gingerols in ginger root. I also believe that the powerful anti-inflammatory compounds in ginger are also helpful, as chronic inflammation has been shown to be connected to cancer (inflammation can occur through eating excessive grains, sugars and not enough anti-inflammatory foods).

Being a powerful anti-inflammatory, it has been shown to be helpful in those with arthritis. Pain in the joints, bones and head may also be relieved through ginger tea. A ginger root tea made with a cinnamon stick and a little stevia may give it an extra anti-inflammatory boost. One of the leading cause of aging is inflammation from diet and lifestyle, as well as general metabolism, so the best thing that one can do is increase anti-inflammatory rich foods and herbs, such as ginger root.

Finally, weight loss can be helped by drinking ginger tea, as inflammation can often suppress hormones that help control hunger and metabolize fat. Ginger root tea, being rather spicy, may also elicit the removal of wastes through causing you to sweat. Spicy foods have also been shown to increase fat burning potential, but it is unclear whether ginger does this the same way peppers do (gingerols are a relative of capsacian).

How to Make Ginger Tea

For two strong cups:

2 tbsp. freshly grated ginger (peeled) 1 cup hot, almost boiling, water 1 cup room temperature water Almond milk, coconut milk and stevia, to taste (optional)

Pour hot water over the fresh ginger and let steep for 30 minutes. For a strong infusion, steep overnight, covered on the counter.

Strain the ginger and add the additional 1 cup of water. Add coconut or almond milk and stevia, if you desire.

For extra anti-inflammatory and blood sugar benefits, steep tea with 1-2 cinnamon sticks, chopped into 1/2″ pieces.

Serves 1-2.

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Immune Boosting Rose Hip Jam

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Immune Boosting Rose Hip Jam

Rose hips are the fruits of a rose-bush and they contain huge amounts of vitamin C, tannins, pectines, and carotene.  This means they are radically immune booting and can be used as a nutritional therapy when you feel a cold coming on. Rose hips are also known to protect the cells during radiation,  and provide a rich antioxidant for the skin. Each tablespoon of the jam contains about 60 mg of vitamin C (which is 2/3 of the daily RDA recommendation.) Simply by soaking your dried Rose Hips, they we turn into a jam like consistency. Then, with a little boost of anti-inflammatory ginger and honey for sweetness you get a delicious and therapeutic treat.

I like to drizzle rose hip jam on my morning oatmeal, add it to berry smoothies, or eat it on a seedy toast.

*Rose hips can be found in a well stocked health food store.

Ingredients 1/4 cup of dried rose hips 1 inch of water above rose hips 1 tsp fresh grated ginger, minced 2 tsp of local honey or stevia * Flax or chia seeds to thicken if needed

DIRECTIONS Add your rose hips to a small jar and cover in water by an extra inch.  Close the jar tightly and let them sit on the counter for 2 hours (or if you leave it overnight, keep it in the fridge.)  When you open them you will find the rose hips have absorbed the water and turned into a jam like consistency.

You are welcome to stop here and use your rose hips as is for a slightly bitter fruit compote.

Or for a smoother jam with an extra depth of flavor, add them to your food processor with ginger and honey and blend until smooth. Sweeten to your taste. You can store the jam in the fridge for up to two weeks.

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Escape the Plague

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Escape the Plague

The flu is hitting hard this year and unless you can talk the boss into letting you work in quarantine, there seems to be no escape from the inevitable. Or is there? Arm yourself with a strong immune system and get ready to evade the plague.  Here are five foods you can add to your diet to naturally boost your immune system and have you ready to fight back! 1) Yogurt and fermented foods. Kefir, sauerkraut, and kombucha are filled with naturally occurring probiotics aka healthy bacteria.  How is bacteria going to keep you healthy? Well, this particular bacteria is considered a “good guy,” lining the walls of the digestive tract, and is your first defense in fighting  off the “bad guys.” Higher levels of good bacteria means an increased response of white blood cells in reaction to an intruder. Be sure you pick dairy that is unsweetened and choose krauts and pickles that have been brined, not pickled.

2) Homemade soup. Homemade soups are an age-old remedy for a reason: stocks are nutritious concentrates of bone and vegetable minerals, and once made into a soup, salty broths actually work to thin and break down mucus.  Pack them full of garlic, onions and ginger — all natural anti-microbials — and add shiitake mushrooms, known for their deep immune stimulation.

3) Red peppers. We’ve all heard that citrus contains vitamin C, which is why many people stock up on orange juice when they are sick. But what they don’t know is that this sugary drink is working against them, when they could be getting twice as much vitamin C from red peppers.  A half-cup of red bell peppers contains one and half more vitamin C than the daily requirement, plus they work wonders to protect your skin, which is your first line of defense. Studies show that vitamin C can reduce the length and severity of a cold, so snack away on raw bell peppers throughout the flu season.

4) Orange you glad you’re healthy? Pumpkins and sweet potatoes are rich in beta carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A. Experts have long known that vitamin A plays a big role in fighting infection and maintaining mucosal integrity.  Vitamin A also helps the cells communicate and create a better defense.

5) Surf and turf. Both beef and oysters are among the foods highest in zinc, along with lamb, pumpkin seeds, spinach, and crab. Zinc deficiencies, which leave you open to infection, are often seen in those with high stress, so go ahead and slurp down a dozen oysters after work.  And when you pick up that steak, remember, always choose organic and free range wherever possible.

*Bonus*

Immune boosting supplements should be thought of as two categories of defense: deep immune support and viral attacks.

Preventative: Take herbs like echinacea, reishi mushrooms and astragalus on the daily for deep immune stimulation.

Corrective: Once your sick you need to directly attack the bug that got you down. Try elderberry syrup, silvercillian, viral attack or kick ass immune as a natural anti viral/microbial.

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