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Turmeric Slow Cooked Oats

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Turmeric Slow Cooked Oats

There's no better way to fight the cold weather than to start your day off with a warm bowl of oatmeal! Try this seasonal version with persimmons, pumpkin seeds and anti-inflammatory turmeric. TURMERIC SLOW COOKED OATS

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups water (or a mix of water and milk)
  • 1 cup steel-cut oats
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp of ground turmeric
  • Pinch of salt

Directions: Pour the water into a saucepan and bring it to a boil over high heat. Then stir in the oats and the salt and stir.

Return the water to a rolling boil (this should only take a few seconds, then reduce heat to low.

Let the oats simmer for anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pan. Cook until the oats are very tender and the oatmeal is as creamy as you like it (longer cooking will make thicker oatmeal). Once cooked, stir in 1 tablespoon of coconut oil

Remember your oats are a vessel for superfoods! Limit your bowl of oats to 1-1.5 cups and then boost the dish with lots of goodness like: ground flax or chia seeds, hemp hearts, nuts, seeds, seasonal fruit.

** Protein boost! Add 1 egg directly into the oats in the last 5 minutes of cooking. This will add 6 grams of protein to your breakfast and give it a custard like texture. **

Serve immediately or refrigerate for 1 week: The oats are ready to eat immediately. You can also let the oats cool and then store them in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. The oats will thicken in the fridge; stir a little milk or water into them when reheating to loosen.

The Skinny: In a world of Paleo & Atkin lovers, oatmeal has gotten a bad rap. I blame this on the "over-sugerfication" of our breakfast cereals. At it's heart, cereals are hearty whole grain that offers fiber, protein and vitamins B & iron. To reclaim your oatmeal you need to think outside the box. Breakfast cereals can be made with any whole grain (think quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, etc.), and should be seen as a vessel for superfoods (not sugar). Load your oatmeal with as many superfoods as you can: Think flax or chia seeds; hemp hearts; raw nuts and seeds; anti-inflammatory spices like turmeric or ginger; eggs for protein; coconut or MCT oil for good fats; etc., etc, etc...

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Grilled Veggies with a Miso Dipping Sauce

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Grilled Veggies with a Miso Dipping Sauce

You are not truly a grill master until you have learned the ropes of the vegetable. Grilled vegetables on their own, or along side your protein, make any meal more gourmet, diverse and more nutritious. In this recipe inspired from the San Francisco Chronicle, the vegetables are paired with a flavorful miso dipping sauce which is frankly so good you'll  find yourself dipping much more than vegetables in it.

Grilled Veggies with a Miso Dipping Sauce

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup white miso

1 Tablespoon fresh ginger (peeled)

2 teaspoons of garlic (aprox. 2 cloves)

2 Tablespoons rice vinegar

2 tables spoons mirin (*can be substituted with 1 Tbs apple cider vinegar, 1 Tbs white wine or sake, and 1 tsp honey*)

1 Tablespoon sesame oil

1/4 olive oil

1 pound of broccolini

Yellow squash, cut lengthwise

1 medium carrots, peeled and sliced length wise

Olive oil as needed

salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS

Place the miso, ginger, garlic, vinegar and mirin in a food processor  or blender. Blend on high until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. Combine the sesame oil and olive oil in a measuring cup and mix together. Slowly drizzle the oil into the miso mixture as you continue to blend it. Taste and adjust to your taste if needed with black pepper and sea salt. Garnish the sesame seeds

Meanwhile heat the grill to medium-high, clean and oil it. Wash and slice all your vegetables as needed and toss with olive or coconut oil and salt and pepper. Grill the vegetables until tender, about 8-10 minutes.

Serve with the miso dipping sauce and impress all your grill master friends!

The Skinny

When you eat animal proteins like eggs, meat, poultry, or fish, your stomach produces hydrochloric acid and an enzyme called pepsin to digest them in the ideal, highly acidic conditions. When you eat carbohydrates your body produces an alkaline environment. When eating protein and carbohydrates together the acid and alkaline environments cancel each other out, making it difficult to digest anything effectively. By eating non-starchy vegetables alongside your protein, you ensure better digestion and proper nutrient absorption.

For more on the principles of check out the Body Ecology Diet.

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Mint Melon Cooler

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Mint Melon Cooler

It's a boiling 70 degrees here in San Francisco and feeling a lot like summer has arrived early. This rare hot spell is a great reminder of what is to come. Stay hydrated and feeling fit with light, refreshing meals. Here is a smoothie that will help you stay cool and get you ready for summer. Natural electrolytes help keep you hydrated while you're out playing in the sunshine. Serve with tiny umbrella (or sip while under a larger one). INGREDIENTS 2 kale leaves

1 small cucumber

3 celery stalks

1/4 avocado

1 whole lemon, peeled

1 cup fresh (or frozen) honeydew melon

10 fresh mint leaves

1 cup coconut water

DIRECTIONS

Blend it up and enjoy!

THE SKINNY

Smoothies are a great way to get your daily calories in check. They generally have about 300-400 calories, and with a good protein powder you'll stay full through lunch time. Plus they are jam-packed with super fresh nutrients and tons of natural fiber. 2- 3 smoothies a week will improve your digestion and immune and keep your weight in check.

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Immune Boosting Rose Hip Jam

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Immune Boosting Rose Hip Jam

Rose hips are the fruits of a rose-bush and they contain huge amounts of vitamin C, tannins, pectines, and carotene.  This means they are radically immune booting and can be used as a nutritional therapy when you feel a cold coming on. Rose hips are also known to protect the cells during radiation,  and provide a rich antioxidant for the skin. Each tablespoon of the jam contains about 60 mg of vitamin C (which is 2/3 of the daily RDA recommendation.) Simply by soaking your dried Rose Hips, they we turn into a jam like consistency. Then, with a little boost of anti-inflammatory ginger and honey for sweetness you get a delicious and therapeutic treat.

I like to drizzle rose hip jam on my morning oatmeal, add it to berry smoothies, or eat it on a seedy toast.

*Rose hips can be found in a well stocked health food store.

Ingredients 1/4 cup of dried rose hips 1 inch of water above rose hips 1 tsp fresh grated ginger, minced 2 tsp of local honey or stevia * Flax or chia seeds to thicken if needed

DIRECTIONS Add your rose hips to a small jar and cover in water by an extra inch.  Close the jar tightly and let them sit on the counter for 2 hours (or if you leave it overnight, keep it in the fridge.)  When you open them you will find the rose hips have absorbed the water and turned into a jam like consistency.

You are welcome to stop here and use your rose hips as is for a slightly bitter fruit compote.

Or for a smoother jam with an extra depth of flavor, add them to your food processor with ginger and honey and blend until smooth. Sweeten to your taste. You can store the jam in the fridge for up to two weeks.

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